The Surveillance Economy

Who doesn’t use technology these days?  How tempting is it for companies, extracting a huge array of data from people to do something with it and monetize from it?

We live in that technological era where a typical user of technology does not necessarily realizes how much information is being tracked and used for monetary purposes.

This reminds me again of that interview by Brian Solis titled Our Digital Society in the Next 30 Years, which also has some interesting thoughts to ponder in regards to social media and the internet.

This podcast episode brings a lot of insights about technology, the use of it and tech companies and what they do with information.

Detailed info here.

Perpetual Upgrades

I received an email from Microsoft/Skype today about the importance of upgrading Skype and how they will stop support for certain versions.

This gave me some inspiration as to write this post. Because, do upgrades always matter?

A while ago I read an article about how Microsoft (and I guess pretty much any software company these days), was using sort of a strategy to push its users to continuously upgrade by discontinuing support.

The point that was made was that, someone with basic needs for an operating system or computer needs in general for that matter, didn’t necessarily have to always buy/upgrade to the latest software version.

I’ve also seen constantly the push for upgrading my iOS software and even the content management system that I mostly use (WordPress) with vulnerability or security issues.

Now that these days everything is the cloud and we rely so much in the internet to do just about anything, it is very important to upgrade.

But for me, the questions remain:

  • How much of new technology did we really need? Or better yet, do we really use?
  • Is there a hidden strategy that companies know that works when pushing upgrades and renewing fees and charges for services/products?
  • Have we become so used to buying software and online services just as it has happened with material consumerism?

Whether upgrades are good or bad, necessary or unnecessary, the idea of perpetual upgrades still continues to trigger some thoughts to ponder.