The Smell of a Bicycle Shop

I had to take my bike to a bike shop today.  And I found myself having childhood memories as the smell of the bike shop almost transported me to those days when I was a BMX fan and I used to have my dad take me to the bike shops and get it fixed.

Interesting how certain smells trigger memories.  I wondered if someone could come up with a lotion/perfume that would smell like a bike shop as they did with the smell of a new Apple product if I am not mistaken.

People Over Profits

Quality over quantity is going to be soon the (only) way to be.  I dare to say that everyone is trying to maximize and scale and grow.  A result of the industrial revolution over these past years, as I call it.  Quality is the key, and when I find people doing this, I can’t help but applaud that approach as well as many other things that I was able to listen in this podcast episode.

I prefer to take one at a time so I can focus fully on you and your mission.

It’s been a couple of years now since I found The Good Life Project.  I’ve seen some interesting interviews here and there.  The value I am getting out of this podcast has been surprising me.  But perhaps more importantly, I find myself reflecting on how much I resonate with a lot of the things that are said.  It is an interesting connection and I am sure I will go back to this post and listen to this again later in the future.

Lots of goodies in this month's @getfaithbox

A post shared by Armando Duran (@armandoduran) on

Travel the World as a Social Media Influencer

About 12 years ago, I used to ponder about the huge potential that social media would cause when everyone would embrace it.  Even back then working remote was a dream that would not seem to be reachable in practical terms.

Just a few years later, it has become more often to find people that are completely embracing exploring the unknown by traveling and at the same time making a living.

Today I found this “How To Travel The World As A Social Media Influencer” post where I found interesting things on this topic like:

Meet today’s traveling social media influencers, a growing wave of savvy professionals who have quit their full-time jobs, left their homes, pared down most of their belongings to the essentials and who now spend their days traveling the world and sharing their experiences with the followers they’ve amassed.

I didn’t quit my job.  But for some health issues I needed to take care of, I ended up being a remote worker.   Perhaps by accident or perhaps my destiny, one day I will know for sure.

The future is here.  The dreams that a few years ago seemed impossible, are just a few clicks away and of course, one decision away!

I feel I could write way more on the topic, perhaps traveling and being a digital nomad has become a passion that I am more than happy to continue to cultivate.

This reminds me of something I recently shared about Digital Nomads & Travel on my “Links we talked about” blog.

 

Exploring Palo Alto

Turns out, today I ended up here in Palo Alto.  I had a good coffee at Peet’s Coffee and I was actually surprised to find that it is in fact cheaper than Starbucks.

After some googling, I found out a few interesting things that are so close to where I am right now.

These include:

This should fill my day today  …. we’ll see how the exploration goes, I am afraid I will get lost in time quite a bit today!

 

Remove HTML tags using jQuery

I will need this simple jQuery code in order to remove some HTML tags as opposed to doing it with CSS.  Because there is a web application I am working on that runs on WordPress, I am making a requirement to have JavaScript enabled in the browser, otherwise the user will be redirected to a static HTML page that suggests to enable JavaScript.

Having said that. Here is the code I am planning to use with which I will be able to remove certain elements that are not necessary.  Even based on the roles and permissions of the user.

See the Pen jQuery Remove by armandoduran (@armandoduran) on CodePen.light

Blog Everyday

I’ve heard this before from Seth Godin and I just heard it again.  It is such a good reminder and a good point.  You never know what you said in the past may help yourself or someone else in the future.

I also think that it brings a lot of clarity to our mental process and in general to know more about ourselves and what we want to do moving forward with our life.

Now, if you happen to be inspired by this and don’t have a blog and/or don’t know how to start one, the easiest way I can recommend to you is this: WordPress.com

Getting Relationship Fields

This title may get confused someone not familiar with coding in WordPress for a moment!

I am leaving some code here for my own reference as I think I will need to have this handy for a number of times or even share it with others that may need it as I continue to work on creating a Web Application using WordPress and Pods and a number of other cool plugins.

This I found from a very good post from SaltnPixels called Playing With Pods.

That said, here is the first peace of code that I will need to adapt on my own logic for traversing the different tables associated with relationship fields in Pods.


Basically the field() function will return an array of pod items from the relating post type. You can then go through these pod items and do what you want with them.

Here I am getting the zoos that are connected to this animal. Then I am going through each of them and echoing out each zoo’s name. I find the most important piece of info is the related ID’s. With those you can do everything.

 

Getting Related ID’s Easier

I don’t usually need all the stuff that comes with the related posts. An array of ID’s is usually simpler to work with for me. Here is a little trick to get the related ID’s as opposed to all of the stuff.

Above I have changed the field function to field('related_zoos.ID') which gets the ID’s only. Now when I make a for each loop, I’m looping through simply ID’s and nothing else. Pretty nifty. You can fine tune the field function to get a list of anything in those posts!

In fact the field() function can take a string that traverses through the tables and gets anything! I can do field('related_zoos.zoo_location') to get a list of zoo locations from each zoo related to this animal!